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, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking a
good luck. god bless. [applause] . . the turning point. a change debate. the role of government, free-market, future trajectory of our nation. in that debate to campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bites, the reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the midst of all of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restor
a number of years in the spanish government from 1977 to 82. he was an active participant in the negotiations for spanish entry to what is now the european union, the european economic community. he also participated in a number of spanish negotiation then they got, not wto and with the european union and spain a century into the union after democracy was restored in spain and spain was welcomed into the european community process. in the last year at this government coming was minister of the presidency, played a very essential role in the entire spanish government situation. shortly after he joined banco santander and has now been there for over 20 years. he is now vice-chairman of the bank, member of the board, also member of the board of banesto, banco santander in portugal, a member of the board of a number of other financial companies in the group and is president of the print of the foundation and spain. i think we are uniquely privileged data to have a speaker from banco santander with its unique ability to see both the spanish situation, the overall banking situat
've seen so far, indicate about the approach to management and governance. today with a simple and outstanding panel of speakers to help us analyze these questions. jon huntsman is a past presidential candidate, so he has a lot of authenticity to discuss these leadership questions. but if i know anything about the subject matter i wouldn't be here today. [laughter] >> we are still please you are here. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l
hollywood, big government, big journalism, and big peace, p, e, a, c, e. he became a big player what is come to be called the new media including work as editor on "the drudge report" website and yes the "huffington post". bull buckley didn't dwell in the past but he believed we should and could learn from it. he was fascinated by the rise of the new media and encouraged conservatives to become involved in it as he had in the old media. he didn't live to see it come to full fruition and andrew left us too soon for him to become a greater influence than he already has. a tribute to him that his web sites and work endure. it is my pleasure as the winner of last year's william f. buckley, jr., award to present this year's award posthumously to andrew breitbart. may he rest in peace. [applause] may he rest in peace and may his legacy live on. accepting the award is oars son dean, susie's father and with him is alley mills dean. ♪ . >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. you may remember me. i formally went on the screen, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some fr
at the washington post before i escaped the belt way with my florida girl. government is not a new topic for me. i did not think i could have written this book if i still lived in washington. the group think is too strong and it is almost impossible to overstate the power of the conventional wisdom that the stimulus was a ludicrous failure and totally uncool to talk about it without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler at a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving pardon that he saved or created four turkeys. my friends here know that i have a contrarian streak. i don't do groupthink. the guy who visited gulf after the bp spill and rode the environmental damage was being overstated, i was right. i had data. arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal was not just considered contrarian but delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. a combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communication, brain dead media coverage, the unfortunate timing of the jobs bill t
make it seem as though that when you talk about limits on the national government, that's antithetical to the constitution, the existence of a national government. it's embeddedded in the original argument. it argument was about limits. it wasn't about -- you hear this kind of and all these people trying to push us back to the article. that's ludicrous. and that's -- but helped to develop the constitution. .. the same time you understand there are some people still fighting the debate that engage in that debate and subsequent to that even in the adoption of 13th and 14th and 15th amendments you still have so we are still talking about what are the amendments of the national guard? what is the role of the national government, how we protect individual rights and liberties etc.. >> what's move forward and start talking about the events that press the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. i want our audience, everybody on c-span it isn't just -- it is a special anniversary, it isn't just a to enter the 25th anniversary of the year that changes everything in human history, we the people. it's al
who are not in the government, it's incumbent on us to continue to encourage cooperation inside and outside. all of us have thoughts and suggestions to offer and some have technological expertise to land or policy expertise as well but it doesn't have to be done internally and it's terrifying when the government says we are here to help you. we are from the transparency community. we are here to help house well. with that i would like to thank all of the panelists. i would like to thank representative fisa and -- issa and quigly. please visit transparentycaucess for the next event and thank you all so much. [applause] i want to raise an issue that has been for two or three weeks specifically on the national security terms. you already are the oldest president in history and some of your staff say you were tired after your most recent encounter with mr. mondale. i recall president kennedy had to go days on end with bear minimum sleep during the cuban missile crisis. is there any doubt in your mind you would be able to function in such circumstances? >> not at all. i want you to k
this can happen if the make of government on november 7 is the same as it is today? >> no. i think will happen for another reason. i think first of all when people figure out there's a big chunk of change, and second of all when you have the debate between the people trying to protect entitlement, and the people trying to kill energy, who are you betting on? >> in california they're saying just allow the winter fuel blend is not early is going to save, make as much as 50 cents a gallon, they've been paying over $5 a gallon in california, and california has created -- [inaudible] >> california is america if we don't change. that's a scary thought. you can see the future, just look to california. it should scare everybody in america. no one would want to go the. part of the answer of california is to stop trying to be the federal government. they can save a lot of money if they pull back from the own agencies and own regulations. but i do think we have this opportunity, to tom's point on this leg of the school got it all fits on a growth like if you will. because i think that we woul
and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have to go back and authorized congress for more trillions of dollars of borrowing. the republicans and lots of people in congress don't want to authorize that. so there is going to be a bloody negotiation, unless they can work a deal. in a sense, this is a book about the past, but it's about the present. it is about where we are going and what the country's future is. if you think about it i would argue that the inability of the government to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president b
of in campaign mode and governing mode. how do they react to moment like this? they obviously don't panic but they do what? how do they take a bad thing and neutralize it and ultimately a good thing. how? >> the president has an expression. talks about our time in the barrel. and he's been the underdog enough times. he has gone through enough times. that, they're smart and they know our time in the barrel is going to come and this now is their time. they're in the barrel and they're going to spend a couple of days trying to convince people that he has game. and, two weeks from now, the debate at hofstra, in new york, he will get to show but, i thought that was a very smart point you made about the sort of soft interviews. i bet we'll see him out doing some tougher ones. mixing it up a little bit showing he has got game. >> couple minutes left. glen tlush is writing analysis, one of many analysis. >> shake the russ off analysis. >> with a hot looking hat. tell me what your analysis says? has it been posted yet? people get a sneak-peek via you? >> i got to tell you man, i just heard the las
. the protection against government sponsorship and promotion of religion, which is a vital component of religious liberty. i will just say a few words about where we are today and where we used to be. they are important right next to each other. as for the separation of church and state, the protection against government sponsorship of religion there was little and today it is far more robust, but absent flows and a lot of that depends on the current competition and chemistry of the supreme court and the rest of the federal court in state courts as well. but a while back there was virtually none. i think there is a great deal more of that protection today. it is very much in jeopardy. on the free exercise side, it is never been particularly robust in this country, unfortunately. and i think it is very fortunate. today it is a mixed bag. in 1990, the supreme court severely limited the constitutional protection for free exercise in the way that i think probably all of us at this table think was wrong. and since then, there have been legislative efforts to correct the problem. what the court said ba
have no problem with requiring an i.d. as long as number one, you know, the government makes a proactive effort to go to people who are qualified to vote, register to vote but you know, don't have i.d.s and you know i wonder for example some states, why does an expired, and i will say this for tsa too, why does an expired driver's license not work? i mean, did your identity change because your driver's license -- license -- -- viewer 93 years old and your driver's license expired four years ago. what is the problem they're? and also that it's kosher. in other words, if a concealed carry permit in texas is allowed, then why isn't a university of texas student i.d. also issued by the state of texas not count? it is kosher and above and beyond that you know i don't think it's particularly onerous. most people in society do have to register. in nursing homes and institutionalized settings or other places. most people do have i.d.s and i think the government could do something to reach into other places and help people get i.d.s but that should be part of the deal. let's go back t
light on the president's service record. 60 minutes has obtained government documents that indicate mr. bush may have received preferential treatment in the guard after not filling his commitments. >> vote republican and you vote to enable george bush to keep rolling as an emperor, a child emperor. but an emperor. >> i have to tell you, as part of record in this case this election. the feeling most people when they hear barack obama speech, i feel that's going up my leg. i don't have that too often. it's a dramatic event. there's nothing to do with politics and has to do with the guy we have about our country. and that is an objective assessment. >> i read that she once took a psychological test is that the position you are most suited for his undertaker. >> on the bus ride up on the snowy road to lebanon, new hampshire, i showed him this week's "newsweek" off the presses. >> how does this feel of all the honors that have come your way, all the publicity? >> well, i have not seen this. it's quite some pain. you know -- >> what is to make you think of? is very loved one? >> last i were
in the book her for a sane men that. you know, every last one who runs for student government president is going to go for congress. but you know, there is not a lack of self-confidence and a lot of young men interested in politics that there isn't young women. and you know, one of the things kassebaum talked about intent is right, so many of the women who have got into politics have gotten in because of some vague. barbara mikulski was preserving her neighborhood. i was that a program at the national archive about four or five years ago i happened to be in washington and not allude to an end, which just written a book called politics with a couple of other women politicians, both parties. they had all gotten in because of some issue. and it was a crosswalk that they needed for her kids to get to school safely. and you know, kassebaum got out on the school board. so if you can get women to get in at that level, then you can begin to develop the confidence, but it is hard i think for women to see themselves in those positions. >> something really struck me that's not in the book. it shou
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15